What a Record Heat Wave in Siberia Means for the World

It wasn’t that long ago when families in Siberia were running errands on snowmobiles in June. This year, the northernmost region of Russia is recording all-time record high temperatures.

Temperatures hit 88 degrees Fahrenheit in May. Once summer came along, 100 degree days began to appear.

The record heat wave in Siberia is causing wildfires to appear. Fishing opportunities are impacting food supplies, while the mosquitoes are flying faster and fiercer than ever.

Since the northern region sees almost 24-hour sunlight during the summer months, residents have started to nail their doors and windows shut with blankets and foil to keep the heat, light, and insects away.

Temperatures in Siberia Reached Negative 90 Degrees Fahrenheit in 1892.

The region famous for exile in Russia now feels like a tropical holiday destination. As the Arctic starts warming, areas of permafrost start melting at levels never recorded in recent history. This process does more than flood pastures or destabilize homes.

It contributes to the release of greenhouse gases responsible for retaining more of the sunlight’s heat. Up to 240 billion tons of carbon could get released by 2100 if the warming cycle continues, accelerating climate change dramatically. 

The warmer weather does bring some benefits to Siberians. Since the sea ice to the north is receding some, traveling between Asia and Europe can happen more quickly through the Arctic Ocean. It may also create energy-creation opportunities with more access to oil and gas reserves.

The hundreds of billions in potential profits also come at a steep price. Permafrost changes could cost Russia at least $100 billion in repairs.

What Does This Mean for the Rest of the World?

The planet tends to adjust its climate in other regions based on how others experience alterations. If Siberia experiences record heat waves, unusually cold temperatures start appearing elsewhere.

Several unusual weather issues have been recorded in 2020. There have been fewer tornadoes this year since the 1950s, a rare derecho that formed west of the Rocky Mountains, and a river in South Dakota that remained above flood stage for over a year.

If Siberia continues to keep baking, more weather changes could develop over the rest of the world. That’s why we need to take the issues of climate seriously.