DNA Evidence Reveals Identity of Paris Serial Killer

For several decades, a notorious serial killer in Paris was haunting the city’s crime squad. This person’s raping and murdering spree from 1986 to 1994 shocked the community, but they remained unsolved until this year.

A former military police officer confessed to being the serial killer right before his death. DNA matching proved that he was indeed present at several crime scenes.

Although all the crimes were shocking, the most disturbing attributed to him was the murder of an 11-year-old child. Her family reported her missing after she failed to show up at her school in 1986.

A lawyer representing the affected families lamented that we’ll probably never know the true extent of the man’s crimes. The killer’s death leaves many unanswered questions. 

The Serial Killer Committed Suicide

An investigator sent letters to 750 military police stationed in Paris during the time of the killing spree. After a potential identification, the man was summoned by police in September to give a DNA sample. His wife reported him missing just three days later.

The 59-year-old was discovered dead in a rented flat along the Mediterranean coast. A suicide note was found there with him, with the DNA collected from the scene matching the evidence taken at several crimes.

In two rapes of children, the man even identified himself as a police officer. That led investigators to believe that one of their own could be committing the crimes.

Now that the killer’s identity is confirmed, lawyers want additional unsolved cases reopened to retest any collected DNA from that era. 

FBI Uses Smartphone App in Global Raid on Organized Crime

An encrypted app that criminals have been using since 2018 was supposed to be the most impenetrable communication tool available. It was seen as a safe place to plot activities, manage illicit drugs, or even talk about murder without law enforcement getting involved.

It turns out that the ANoM app, which is a black-market only product accessible on prepared mobile devices, was being covertly monitored by Australia’s Federal Police (AFP) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for almost the entire time.

Australia announced that the intelligence gathered from the messages sent across the app led to over 220 arrests and more than 500 charges. The AFP seizes 3.7 metric tons of illicit drugs and about $35 million in cash during that time. Most of the individuals have links to the Italian mafia, Asian crime syndicates, and even motorcycle gangs.

The FBI Got the App from Its Developer

According to court documents released by the United States, the ANoM app was given to FBI agents in the San Diego office by the developer who made it. Officials haven’t released the person’s identity, but they did state that the individual was helping with ongoing investigations in return for a reduced sentence.

The top five countries where the app was used were Germany, Spain, Australia, Serbia, and the Netherlands.

People using the ANoM app were so confident in its security that they didn’t use pseudonyms or codes when communicating with others. Their brazen conversations would become the foundation for many of the charges levied as officials took down the organized crime network.

Over the three years the investigation was active, over 9,000 police officers in 18 different countries helped maintain the operation. Numerous news sites can help you to stay in touch with investigations like this.