These Cities Will Host Future Olympic Games

When athletes need an extra competitive edge, they look for meaningful solutions that help them train more effectively.

That’s why you’ll see people training at high altitudes or making dietary adjustments. You might even see products from Thorne Research as part of their daily routine.

Although every athlete trains for competition, it takes plenty of dedication and courage to prepare for the Olympics. These future cities are already planning on hosting future events. 

What Cities Will Host the Olympic Games After Tokyo? 

The International Olympic Committee has already chosen several cities to serve as venues for future competitions. Here is the current list of destinations currently planned after the Tokyo games.

1. Beijing (2022 Winter Games)

Beijing will host the Olympics, with the event scheduled for February 2022. It’s the first winter version held in the country. It’s also the first time the same city has hosted the summer and winter games.

2. Paris (2024 Summer Games)

After Hamburg, Rome, and Budapest withdrew from hosting in 2015, the Olympic Committee awarded the remaining two cities concurrent events. It’s the sixth competition France will host, with the first happening in 1904.

3. Milan Cortina (2026 Winter Games)

These games are co-hosted between Milan and Cortina d’Ampezzo, marking the first time two cities are listed as official hosts. It’ll be the fourth time Italy gets the Olympics and a return to some venues when Cortina hosted in 1956.

4. Los Angeles (2028 Summer Games)

When LA hosts the Olympics, it’ll be one of only three cities to host the event three times. Paris and London are the other two locations. This event will also mark a return to the United States for the first time since 2002.

5. Brisbane (2032 Summer Games)

Australia hosts the Olympics for the third time with this scheduled event. The confirmation is so far in advance to ensure local officials have enough time to plan and build infrastructure needs.

What Olympic destination are you most excited to visit in the coming years? 

The Final Impact of Heatwaves Across the World

Have you heard the news? Climate change is impacting the way our world works. Whether you believe it is a human-made condition or a natural planetary cycle doesn’t matter at this point. 


We know the world is getting warmer. That means the impact of heatwaves globally can cause massive changes to how all of us approach life.

Record-Breaking Heat Struck the Pacific Northwest in June

When the first heat dome formed in 2021, it sent temperatures through the roof in places where air conditioning isn’t installed in homes by default. Portland and Seattle both reached more than 108 °F, with the former topping out at 116°F.

In July, another heat dome formed in Northern California, causing temperatures around Sacramento to soar above 120°F in localized spots.

Canada recorded its highest temperature ever in Lytton at 49.6°C, shattering the 45°C reading from 1957. It’s the highest temperature recorded above 50N latitude. 

Long-Term Drought Amplifies the Problem

If you take a trip to Lake Shasta or Lake Mead, you can see how much the water levels have shrunk in recent years. With the dry conditions amplifying the heat, water is becoming a scarce commodity.

Most heat waves last for about five days, although they can linger if high-pressure systems get blocked. 

It’s not just during the day that we need to worry about things. The overnight low temps since 1895 have been increasing at nearly twice the rate of afternoon highs, and the ten warmest minimum temperatures in the United States ever recorded have all happened since 2002.

What can we do to make changes? It starts by switching from the burning of fossil fuels. By reducing the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere that reflects heat and sunlight, we can dissipate the heat more readily. 

We’re running out of time to act. Things will keep getting worse until changes are made. It will take all of us to battle this problem together. 

Everything We Know About the Delta Variant of Coronavirus

When the Delta variant struck India, it caused record numbers of infections. Hospitalization rates skyrocketed, oxygen was in high demand, and there weren’t enough beds to accommodate everyone who became ill.

After the wave hit India, it went on to impact the world. Infection rates rose sharply even in countries with robust vaccination programs.

While you give your immune system a boost with Apricot Power and Irwin Naturals, please remember to consider vaccination as a tool to help you and your family get through this pandemic as safely as possible.

Facts About the Coronavirus Delta Variant

1. The Delta variant is more contagious than the other coronavirus strains. That’s why it spread around the world so quickly. By the end of July 2021, it accounted for about 80% of all new cases in the United States.

2. Although all people have a small risk to consider, vaccines limit the issue significantly. Individuals who haven’t received their COVID vaccine are 2.5 times more likely to become infected by this coronavirus variant.

3. The transmissibility of the Delta variant is so high that it could lead to numerous local outbreaks. It can skip from one poorly vaccinated area to another, especially since vaccinations in children under 12 haven’t come close to reaching goals.

4. Breakthrough cases happen, but it often creates less severe symptoms when it does.

We have a lot more to learn about the Delta variant. Until these issues get under control, the best option for everyone is to mask up, get vaccinated, and maintain social distancing. 

Iceberg the Size of NYC Breaks Off Ice Shelf

Whether you believe that climate change is a natural event or a human-made phenomenon doesn’t matter because temperatures are warming. That evidence was made even more apparent in February 2021 when an iceberg the size of New York City broke off of Antarctica’s ice shelf.

The Brunt Ice Shelf sees some seasonal changes each year, but it has never lost a 490-square-mile chunk of itself in the past.

Although the size of the break is shocking, scientists and glaciologists have expected this calving event for about a decade. Several chasms had formed along the ice, which meant it was only a matter of time until something happened.

What Happens Next with the Giant Iceberg?

The iceberg’s calving impact will remain unknown for the next few months. Scientists say that the new massive chunk could stay close to its ice shelf, essentially maintaining the structure while being casually separate from it.

It could also start floating away instead of running aground, impacting the ocean’s health in several ways.

The Brunt Ice Shelf is the home of the British Antarctic Survey’s Halley Research Station. Authorities moved the facility further inland in 2016 to avoid the different chams that were forming.

Researchers continue to keep a close eye on the issue to assess its potential impact on the rest of the ice shelf.

Facts About Global Warming to Consider

With the Industrial Revolution events that helped us to create modern society, we started generating more carbon dioxide than at any other point in history. Some researchers estimate that we have more CO2 in the atmosphere than at any other point in the last 800,000 years.

The United States produces 25% of this pollution while comprising only 4% of the world’s population.

Since the late 19th century, global sea levels have risen by at least eight inches. Continued heat waves may cause additional concerns, create stronger storms, and trigger more heat-related illnesses.

It is up to us to do something. Although an iceberg the size of NYC is a notable event, it doesn’t need to be the end of the story.

What Do We Know About the New COVID-19 Strains?

All viruses mutate. Scientists expected that the new coronavirus would change and adapt to the environment as it got opportunities to explore.

The problem with viral mutations is that the process can be unpredictable. If something happens that makes COVID-19 more transmissible or deadly, it could impact how we can manage the disease.

It also changes how the developed vaccines work against it, although the mRNA sequences are still relatively the same

Three Variants Have Scientists Sounding Alarms

We know of three coronavirus evolutions that have changed the way we respond to COVID-19. The first one happened in May 2020, which is the D614G variant. This change made the coronavirus more transmissible to others, although the death rates remained relatively constant.

The second variant is called B.1.1.7, commonly referred to as the “UK variant” in the press. Research suggests that this evolution not only makes the virus more contagious, but it could also be deadlier. Vaccine producers have enough concerns about it that they’re proposing a third booster might be necessary to provide enough protection.

A third variant is called B.1.351, which is often called the “South African variant.” It is more contagious, but it might have the same fatality rate among those it infects.

Additional variants in Ohio and Los Angeles have also been identified, with research exploring ways to treat these options.

What Will the Vaccines Do to the Variants?

The vaccine producers are not overly concerned about the different mutations they see in the coronavirus. Since they can quickly change the mRNA sequences that trigger an immune response in the body, it won’t take nearly as long to develop counter-agents against each new evolution.

What you might eventually see in a COVID-19 vaccination is a series of mRNA sequences for each variant that gets delivered all at once. For now, you’ll need to keep wearing a mask, practice social distancing, and take care of yourself to prevent these variants from spreading.